Aquaseal Basement Foundation Concrete Crack Repair Specialist Ontario

Aquaseal Basement Foundation Concrete Crack Repair Specialist Ontario
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Ashpark Basement Waterproofing Contractors 1-800-334-6290

Ashpark Basement Waterproofing Contractors 1-800-334-6290
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Friday, December 3, 2010

Interior Weeping Tile Drainage Systems


Interior Weeping Tile Drainage Systems
If you are having trouble with cracked or leaking foundation walls where gallons of water accumulate on the floor or there is a high water table that forces water up through cracks in your basement floor, then you should consider having an interior perimeter drain installed. To install this form of waterproofing we must first break up the concrete floor along the foundation wall approximately 12 inches wide. After this we install a system platon against the foundation wall and into the trench. In the trench we install a 4 inch perimeter perforated weeping tile which is connected to either a floor drain or a sump-pump pit. We then cover the weeping tile with gravel and re-concrete the floor.

Inside drain systems can be a more practical application versus exterior waterproofing due to factors concerning the workable area outside (a deck, pool, paved driveway, and landscaping can be some issues) and the fact that exterior excavation/waterproofing in the end is more expensive. Please note that interior drainage systems can cost you roughly half the cost as an exterior waterproofing/excavation job. An interior basement drain system does not necessarily have to be installed throughout the entire basement; it can be installed in a small area where the threat of leakage is apparent.


French Drain
A French drain may be a solution to redirect water if you have standing groundwater on your property. This can help keep water out of your foundation and eventually your basement. While this is not a complete cure all for all potential water problems, a French drain can be a good solution if water gathers on your yard near your foundation and does not drain properly.
Standing groundwater is usually a problem when grading is not constructed properly around your home. If the slope is not correct, ground water will collect near or run towards your home’s foundation. This can be detrimental in more than one way. The most obvious is that this water can infiltrate your basement causing damp conditions if not thoroughly flooding your basement at times. In addition, and usually less obvious until major damage has occurred, this water can actually undermine the integrity of your foundation walls. At this point, your whole house is in jeopardy, not just your basement.
A French drain is constructed by digging a trench in the ground and then filling the trench with a filter material such as loose gravel or porous pipe covered with gravel. The trench is dug in such a way that gravity will pull the water away from your foundation to some other point on your property or even to a city drainage system. It is important to consult city and/or county building codes to determine proper termination of the French drain.
So, if groundwater is a problem for you and your property, a French drain just might be the way to go for you.

Weeping Tile Drain System
A weeping tile is a 4 inch pipe used for underground drainage. The pipe is typically plastic with small slits cut into it. It is covered with 3/4 inch clear stone. The 3/4 inch clear stone prevents soil from falling through the slits into the weeping tile causing blockage. With this arrangement, water in the surrounding soil above the weeping tile flows, into the weeping tile. The weeping tile then drains into a storm sewer or a sump pump.
It is often used for water drainage at basement foundations footings to prevent water damage.
The weeping tile is typically installed lower than the interior basement floor. The weeping tile should be connected to a sump pit, located on the interior of the home. The ground water collected in the sump pit can then be removed by a sump pump. The removed water is then drained through the weeping tile far from the home or into a the city storm drain .
Both types draw water from the basin and disperse it outside of the basement. While horsepower might be a good indicator of power for most machinery, when it comes to sump pumps, the gallons per minute it can move is more important. This is the best gauge to determine how quickly and how much water the pump can remove. It is a good idea to spend the extra money to get a pump that will be more than your basement actually needs. This way the pump isn’t straining to keep up with the water flow and will last you longer.
Sump pumps are pretty much pointless without a good backup system in place. A good backup system will consist of a second pump to handle extra water flow during heavy storms as well as an alternate power source such as a marine battery. This is especially important because it is usually when you need your pump the most (thunderstorms) that your electrical power is most likely to be interrupted.

Basement Wall Covered With Drainage System
Weeping Tile Cleaning/Jetting
Over time weeping tile systems can become clogged with clay, minerals, sediment or soil that has seeped through the filtration process. Instead of taking the more expensive approach of replacing the entire weeping tile system, we may suggest the excavation and cleaning of your weeping tile by sending 3000 psi at 5.6 gpm of water through the weeping tile and flush out all the clogged particles. Depending on the age of your house will depend on which type of weeping tile your house will have and which tactic we would use to clean it out. If your home is built before 1973, it most likely has a clay pipe weeping tile system with a 90 degree "elbow" shaped pipe at each corner.
Do to the angle of the pipe, sending the line around the corner of your house is difficult, so in order to flush the pipe efficiently we excavate at opposite corners of your home and feed the line in from those locations. If you home has Big "O" weeping tile, feeding the line around the corners of the home is a breeze.
Sump Pump
Sump pumps can be a good way to go if you have a problem with your basement being flooded either by weather or hydrostatic conditions. There are many different sump pumps with different horsepower, gallons per minute, backup options and alarms, as well as different assemblies.
Let’s start with some basics, the assembly of sump pumps. You have a couple of options here. A pedestal sump pump is constructed so that the pump itself sits on a pedestal above the sump basin or have the pump actually sitting inside the sump basin.
Both types draw water from the basin and disperse it outside of the basement. While horsepower might be a good indicator of power for most machinery, when it comes to sump pumps, the gallons per minute it can move is more important. This is the best gauge to determine how quickly and how much water the pump can remove. It is a good idea to spend the extra money to get a pump that will be more than your basement actually needs. This way the pump isn’t straining to keep up with the water flow and will last you longer.
Sump pumps are pretty much pointless without a good backup system in place. A good backup system will consist of a second pump to handle extra water flow during heavy storms as well as an alternate power source such as a marine battery. This is especially important because it is usually when you need your pump the most (thunderstorms) that your electrical power is most likely to be interrupted

Interior Weeping Tile Drainage Systems, Interior Weeping Tile Drainage Systems, Interior Weeping Tile Drainage Systems

1 comment:

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